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Archive for January, 2012

Today is Australia Day

January26

Today is Australia Day! Here are some interesting Australian facts from this website: * The Australian Coat Of Arms has on it a kangaroo and an emu. The reason for this is that the kangaroo and the emu cannot go backwards but can only walk forwards. (Editor’s note: of course there are many very unique […]

Great Interactive Maths Site at Waldomaths

January25

This site is a really good interactive maths site. I have found it fabulous for geometry concepts, etc. and it has Java apps suitable for most ages.

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Fields Medal Part II

January25

Yes, here is the follow up to the earlier post. Mr Vaughan Jones is an old boy of the school (Auckland Grammar School) in Auckland that I taught at for many years. He was awarded the Fields Medal in 1990 for his amazing work on the Mathematics of Knots. Mr Jones also famously wore a New […]

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There is Pi in the Maths Sky!

January25

Just when I thought I had seen everything I discovered a really good maths magazine, called Pi in the Sky, for growing more senior high school mathematicians. Check out this excellent resource from Alberta in Canada. Yes, you may be disappointed that they don’t use the metric system yet in their problems but, nevertheless, they […]

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Mathematical Humor ;-) Pi in the Sky

January25
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Fields Medal – the Olympic Medal for Mathematics

January24

The Fields Medal is the highest honour for Mathematicians. It has an interesting history and the recipients are diverse in both their character and achievements. Another story about that soon! Here is another good post about recent Fields Medal recipients.

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Who are the greatest mathematicians?

January23

As a student of Mathematics you are no doubt wondering who the greatest mathematicians were, or are? No ? Well perhaps you should be – after all, if you are a keen cyclist then you will follow the Tour de France winners or, if you are a tennis player, perhaps the recent events at The […]

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An Old Puzzle…

January19

I remember when I was doing Stage I Mathematics that our text (Principles of Mathematics by Carl Allendoerfer and Cletus Oakley!) contained a puzzlement something like this; “I will prove that 2 = 1.  Your job is to show why such a logical proof could possibly be wrong.  It isn’t sufficient to point out that […]

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Boy with Incredible Brain

January12

Link to this article and movie which highlights the amazing, enviable talents that students with autism often (or usually) have. Note that the word “savant” refers to “Savant syndrome is a rare condition in which people with developmental disorders have one or more areas of expertise” (source: wikipedia)  

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First Day of 2012

January1

Wow – hard to believe that we are already into 2012 (image from http://www.flickr.com/photos/triplejworld/6610786893/). Makes me think about the date 01/01/2012 – just using the digits 0,1,2. How often does that happen? When will it happen next? OK., so it’s not that hard – how about 02/01/2012, 10/01/2011, 11/01/2012, 21/01/2012, and 01/02/2012, etc? So, how […]

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Post Support

NCEA Level 2 Algebra Problem. Using the information given, the shaded area = 9, that is:
y(y-8) = 9 –> y.y – 8y – 9 =0
–> (y-9)(y+1) = 0, therefore y = 9 (can’t have a distance of – 1 for the other solution for y)
Using the top and bottom of the rectangle,
x = (y-8)(y+2) = (9-8)(9+2) = 11
but, the left side = (x-4) = 11-4 = 7, but rhs = y+? = 9+?, which is greater than the value of the opp. side??
[I think that the left had side was a mistake and should have read (x+4)?]

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