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Archive for October, 2014

Online marketing insults student intelligence

October13

It happens often – a popup that entices you to apply your mathematical intelligence to enter into a giveaway. Of course, the only giveaway is you giving away your precious personal information! This is a typical (but not active) example and, whichever choice is selected (4, 5, or 7), is a winning answer. There is […]

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The Distributive Law

October9

Growing Students of Mathematics need to understand some fundamental laws that are integral to the subject. Knowing how these laws work help with accuracy in solving problems. The Distributive Law is a key one to learn. Its use goes way back to the 1800s and it explains how we use parentheses ( ) in Algebra. […]

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Top 3 Universities for Mathematics

October6

In the QS World University Rankings by Subject 2013/14, here are the top three universities for Mathematics: Now that we mentioned Harvard, here is a recent article from Harvard’s Gazette, on news of a prestigious Harvard prize, awarded to Mathematics. “The MacArthur awards, often called “genius” grants, are given annually to about two dozen recipients […]

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Using Math to predict the future…

October3

Predicting the future to make money – that’s what Ernie Chow does for an investment funds manager. His skill in developing differential equations to model future trends in the stock market, along with his ability to solve those same equations means he can predict the future. Or at least do it as well as science […]

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Proof

October2

A mathematical proof is an argument from accurate assumptions to reach a conclusion. Each step of the argument follows the laws of logic. Consider the logic in this statement: I can eat cheese The moon is made of cheese; Therefore, I can eat the moon! In Mathematics, a statement is not accepted as valid or […]

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NCEA Level 2 Algebra Problem. Using the information given, the shaded area = 9, that is:
y(y-8) = 9 –> y.y – 8y – 9 =0
–> (y-9)(y+1) = 0, therefore y = 9 (can’t have a distance of – 1 for the other solution for y)
Using the top and bottom of the rectangle,
x = (y-8)(y+2) = (9-8)(9+2) = 11
but, the left side = (x-4) = 11-4 = 7, but rhs = y+? = 9+?, which is greater than the value of the opp. side??
[I think that the left had side was a mistake and should have read (x+4)?]

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