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Posts tagged with measurement

It’s a small world after all

January20

Size matters to mathematicians, as well as scientists (another name for mathematicians). Last year, scientists (aka mathematicians) at York University recorded the radius of a proton at 0.833 femtometres, or just under one trillionth of a millimetre. It’s enough to make your head (like your protons) spin! Incidentally, and totally unrelated, H3 visited the Music […]

What about Watts?

December13

Most of us have a basic understanding of power. Walking upstairs takes a certain level of effort, but when we add a large sack of potatoes to the shoulder it takes more energy. Power is commonly measured in watts. Variables here but riding a bike at a leisurely 15 mph on a flat windless road […]

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Galloping galaxies – Pt II

November2

The universe doesn’t look right. It suddenly looks . . . out of whack. The universe is unimaginably big, and it keeps getting bigger. But astronomers cannot agree on how quickly it is growing – and the more they study the problem, the more they disagree. Some scientists call this a “crisis” in cosmology. A […]

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Measuring Ocean Waves – Wow!

May4

Waves in the Southern Ocean have already been recorded over 20 metres in height, but new research shows they’re getting higher. A small but significant increase of 1.5 metres per second – 8 per cent – was noted by researchers who analysed approximately 4 billion observations from 31 satellites and 80 ocean buoys worldwide. “Although increases of […]

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Radical Ratios

May2

Taking a person, when squatting, to be approx. a meter in diameter, we end up with the following ‘radical ratios’: 1. The size of a human cell to that person is the same ratio as a person’s size to Rhode Island 2. The size of a virus to a person is the same ratio as […]

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Measurement Factoid

March26

DYK (Did you know) – that a typical acre (0.40 hectares) of soil contains 400kg of earthworms, 1000kg of fungi, 680kg of bacteria and 400kg of insects.

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Logo City inspires Integrated Learning in Year 9

November21

From a resource at Teachers Pay Teachers called “Building My Block” a Year 9 class used this Porject-Based learning activity to integrate their Mathematics with English and Food Technology. How to go about this activity? 1. Purchase the resource if you are extra keen. Or, 2. Simply make up a template to enable each student […]

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Having fun in a knowledge economy!

March23

“The NCAA men’s basketball tournament began last Thursday.  It is estimated that more than 60 million Americans have completed tournament brackets predicting the winners and losers.  Across the country, employees are spending workday time monitoring games, and discussing predictions and results with colleagues.  Many are waging bets. According to one estimate, the cost of lost wages […]

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Use King Henry to convert measurements

March23

Good old King Henry (seen here working on his times tables!). Well, maybe or maybe not. He was, after all, not liked by everyone, so what is he doing on a H3 Maths? Well, “King Henry” is most useful when it comes to doing conversions of measurements. Remember this phrase and you will be able […]

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Measuring to the nth degree…

June3

Researchers in Australia have developed the world’s most sensitive thermometer—and it measures temperature with a precision of 30 billionths of a degree using the properties of a circle! Read the article here.

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10 x 9 x 8 + (7 + 6) x 5 x 4 x (3 + 2) x 1 = 2020

NCEA Level 2 Algebra Problem. Using the information given, the shaded area = 9, that is:
y(y-8) = 9 –> y.y – 8y – 9 =0
–> (y-9)(y+1) = 0, therefore y = 9 (can’t have a distance of – 1 for the other solution for y)
Using the top and bottom of the rectangle,
x = (y-8)(y+2) = (9-8)(9+2) = 11
but, the left side = (x-4) = 11-4 = 7, but rhs = y+? = 9+?, which is greater than the value of the opp. side??
[I think that the left had side was a mistake and should have read (x+4)?]

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