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Posts tagged with measurement

The Art of Rectangular Pyramids

January15

Ah…The Louvre – perhaps the world’s most famous museum and an iconic, classical building which is noted for its modernistic entry which uses pyramids to contrast its surroundings. (H3 was taken aback by the beauty of this entry and the way in which it differed so much to the style of the French buildings and […]

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Pi from Pies…

May18
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10!

April30

Yes, iTunes is celebrating its 10th birthday! Click on the image to see a timeline of the incredible growth of this onine music phenomenon. The stats are staggering! On 28th of April, 2003 Apple launched the iTunes Music Store with just 200,000 songs. The launch of iTunes also tapped into a pent-up demand for digital […]

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New Device measures fun!

April27

Who said that statistics were boring? Check this cool gadget out… “A rugged activity tracker that purports to ‘count fun’ (not calories) and measures movements unique to action sports like surf, skate, snow, moto, MTB, BMX, and the likes. It’s built to withstand snow, surf, dirt, and hard pavement knocks and is a modular device […]

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Meaurements lead to archaeological find

April21

The structure is comprised of basalt rocks, arranged in the shape of a cone. It measures 230 feet (70 meters) at the base of the structure, is 32 feet (10 meters) tall, and weighs an estimated 60,000 tons. It is twice the size of the ancient stone circle at Stonehenge in England.  What is it? […]

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How many cc’s in these?

March29

It can be quite difficult for students to visualise the size of a cubic centimetre, and find out how many of these make up a litre (or other volume measurement). The best way is to actually use a number of cubic centimetres to do this with. The practical exercise helps cement the idea that 1 […]

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Measure Things!

March21

                  We would encourage you to measure things – find the lengths, areas and volumes of common objects. Here is a really good way to start: first, guess the measurement you are trying to find; then measure and compare your results. With a little practice you will […]

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Online Conversion of Measurements

March17

There are many good online conversion tools for changing distances, weights, areas and volumes, etc. This is one that is quite easy to use: You might ask why this skill is useful? Good question. Well, consider the human errors that led to a Boeing plane running out of fuel at 41,000 feet. Why? Largely because […]

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Depth (noun)…

December15

…a dimension taken through an object or body of material,usually downward from an upper surface, horizontally inward from an outer surface, or from top to bottom of something regarded as one of several layers. Depth has different meanings, depending on how tall you are!

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Beauty Math

November17

This just in… “Beauty contestants in China’s Hubei province must now comply with minimum body requirements. Among them, according to China’s Global Post, the space between the pupils should be 46 per cent of the distance between each pupil and the nearer ear, and the distance between a candidate’s nipples should be at least 20cm.” […]

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Post Support

NCEA Level 2 Algebra Problem. Using the information given, the shaded area = 9, that is:
y(y-8) = 9 –> y.y – 8y – 9 =0
–> (y-9)(y+1) = 0, therefore y = 9 (can’t have a distance of – 1 for the other solution for y)
Using the top and bottom of the rectangle,
x = (y-8)(y+2) = (9-8)(9+2) = 11
but, the left side = (x-4) = 11-4 = 7, but rhs = y+? = 9+?, which is greater than the value of the opp. side??
[I think that the left had side was a mistake and should have read (x+4)?]

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