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Posts tagged with proof

The Math of Christmas

December24

In the Bible there are some 300 prophecies concerning the arrival and life of Jesus Christ, the Messiah. Here are 8 of those 300 prophecies and the mathematical probability that they happened: (1) The Messiah will be born in Bethlehem. (Micah 5:2; Matthew 2:1; Luke 2:4-6) (2) The Messiah will be a descendant of Jacob. […]

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Can 1 = 3?

October26
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Proof

October2

A mathematical proof is an argument from accurate assumptions to reach a conclusion. Each step of the argument follows the laws of logic. Consider the logic in this statement: I can eat cheese The moon is made of cheese; Therefore, I can eat the moon! In Mathematics, a statement is not accepted as valid or […]

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1 = 3 What? Call the Math Doctor!

September24

Yes, you read about it here on H3! In Year 10 you learn the basic laws when working with logarithms. Do you remember what a logarithm is? If not, read more here from an earlier post. Then, take one of these laws (the log of a power) and you can prove, in about as many […]

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Prime Numbers are in their prime!

September13

A Japanese mathematician claims to have the proof for the ABC conjecture, a statement about the relationship between prime numbers that has been called the most important unsolved problem in number theory. If Shinichi Mochizuki’s 500-page proof stands up to scrutiny, mathematicians say it will represent one of the most astounding achievements of mathematics of […]

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Post Support

NCEA Level 2 Algebra Problem. Using the information given, the shaded area = 9, that is:
y(y-8) = 9 –> y.y – 8y – 9 =0
–> (y-9)(y+1) = 0, therefore y = 9 (can’t have a distance of – 1 for the other solution for y)
Using the top and bottom of the rectangle,
x = (y-8)(y+2) = (9-8)(9+2) = 11
but, the left side = (x-4) = 11-4 = 7, but rhs = y+? = 9+?, which is greater than the value of the opp. side??
[I think that the left had side was a mistake and should have read (x+4)?]

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