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Posts tagged with puzzle

2x50c = stumped!

November4

A question in a high school maths exam has sparked heated online debate after students complained it was far too difficult. Australian Year 12 students in Victoria sat the VCE maths exam on October 30 and were faced with a problem that is sure to change the way they look at 50 cent coins forever. […]

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Puzzle Time again!

October24

Five members of the School Math team are running late for a big competition and hurrying toward the Hall—but they have to cross the stream that cuts through the campus. When they reach the stream, there’s a small boat tied up on their side that they can “borrow” to get to the other side. The […]

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You better choose the right door!

June22

Raymond Merrill Smullyan (born May 25, 1919) is an American mathematician, concert pianist, and logician, etc. One of his most famous puzzles was used in the 1986 film Labyrinth. The puzzle is based on a story of two doors and two guards. one guard always lies and one always tells the truth. One door leads […]

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The parking lot puzzle

June21

H3 Note: Give yourself about 30 sec to do this. Answer is in the Post Support

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Math goes around the world

February13

The Circumference Problem: Let’s assume that the earth is circular. We put a rope around the equator but then decide that it is best to be one metre off the ground. How much more rope will we need? The answer is in the Post Support!

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1 = 3 What? Call the Math Doctor!

September24

Yes, you read about it here on H3! In Year 10 you learn the basic laws when working with logarithms. Do you remember what a logarithm is? If not, read more here from an earlier post. Then, take one of these laws (the log of a power) and you can prove, in about as many […]

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The Census Puzzle

September26

Delight yourself in some mathematical detective work to see if you can figure this problem out! A member of a census organization is going door-to-door collecting information. He comes to a house where a woman answers the door. After introducing himself, he asks her how many adults live in the house. “Just me,” she replies, […]

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Equation Puzzle Solution…

July29

Just because you didn’t ask here is the solution to the earlier equation puzzle with the 5’s:

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Making Sense of an Equation

July10

Use one straight line to make this following equation true (2 solutions possible) Note: Answer will be posted soon, unless someone else gets it first!

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Geometric Challenge at Job Interview

March31

As we head for holidays here I thought you might enjoy this cartoon;

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Post Support

The graph on the left (Coronavirus) is for a time period of 30 days, while the one on the right (SARS) is for 8 months! Very poor graphical comparison and hardly relevant, unless it is attempting to downplay the seriousness of the coronavirus?

10 x 9 x 8 + (7 + 6) x 5 x 4 x (3 + 2) x 1 = 2020

NCEA Level 2 Algebra Problem. Using the information given, the shaded area = 9, that is:
y(y-8) = 9 –> y.y – 8y – 9 =0
–> (y-9)(y+1) = 0, therefore y = 9 (can’t have a distance of – 1 for the other solution for y)
Using the top and bottom of the rectangle,
x = (y-8)(y+2) = (9-8)(9+2) = 11
but, the left side = (x-4) = 11-4 = 7, but rhs = y+? = 9+?, which is greater than the value of the opp. side??
[I think that the left had side was a mistake and should have read (x+4)?]

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