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Archive for March, 2013

Air Traffic Controller – Math Career

March31

Air traffic controller uses math in order to be able to understand distances and measurements at a moment’s notice. They also must be able to do mental math quickly and accurately. Part of their job is directing aircraft at what altitude and speed to fly. An error in these directions could be fatal so a […]

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Which is the best graph for the data?

March31

So, growing mathematicians, how would you best graph the data in the previous post? We have 867 for Australia and 57 for France. Can these be fitted easily onto a y-axis (vertically)? Is a column graph (with gaps) better than a histogram (with no gaps)? Or would you use a pie or line graph? As […]

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Thanks!

March30

We are amazed that anyone would be that interested in our H3 Maths blog. And, here is a little secret, only three people have actually asked what the “H3” means! Now that we have reached 4000 viewers we just wanted to say: 1. Thanks for looking! 2. Thanks to those regulars, such as the one […]

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How many cc’s in these?

March29

It can be quite difficult for students to visualise the size of a cubic centimetre, and find out how many of these make up a litre (or other volume measurement). The best way is to actually use a number of cubic centimetres to do this with. The practical exercise helps cement the idea that 1 […]

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Paradox of sharing the same birthday…

March28

How many people need to be crowded into a room before two of them are likely to have the same birthday? The answer is a mere 23 to have a fifty-fifty shot. To bring the probability to ninety-nine percent, you need a crowd of only 57 people. And yet there are three hundred and sixty-five […]

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Primetime News…

March26

              The Great Internet Mersenne Prime Search (GIMPS) has done it again! The project has just discovered the largest known prime number: 257,885,161-1. This massive 17,425,170 digit number, was discovered to be prime (ie. divisible only by 1 and itself) on 25 January on the idling computer of University of Central Missourimathematician, Curtis Cooper. As well as […]

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Never, never, never give up on your Mathematics

March24
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Better Math = Better $$$; Better English = Better $

March22

An important, if troubling, bit of research has just been published by the Institute for Fiscal Studies, backed with some government money. It shows that 10-year-olds who are good at mathematics earn significantly more once they reach their thirties than those who are not. The IFS took a large group of children born in April 1970, […]

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Measure Things!

March21

                  We would encourage you to measure things – find the lengths, areas and volumes of common objects. Here is a really good way to start: first, guess the measurement you are trying to find; then measure and compare your results. With a little practice you will […]

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Online Conversion of Measurements

March17

There are many good online conversion tools for changing distances, weights, areas and volumes, etc. This is one that is quite easy to use: You might ask why this skill is useful? Good question. Well, consider the human errors that led to a Boeing plane running out of fuel at 41,000 feet. Why? Largely because […]

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Post Support

Where are you? the North Pole

Prize Object Puzzle: If Sue does not know where the prize is in the first question, it can’t be under the square. She must have been told it is under another shape. Apply this same logic to Colin. It is then obvious that the prize cannot be under a yellow object. That helps Sue eliminate her yellow shapes. Got the idea?

Algebra Puzzle: Answer = 1

Popular Math Problems Answers: 1, 1

Number of tabs? According to Lifehacker, the ideal number of tabs you should have open is nine. Yes, a single digit. To some, this is like playing a piano and only using a fraction of the notes!

Worst Graph? Where to start. What a visual mess and even some of the lines merge and are impossible to follow. A graph is a visual display of data, with the goal to identify trends or patterns. This is a spider’s web of information which fails to show a clear pattern at all. Solution? Well, different colors would help, or why not group in two or three graphs where trends are similar?

Number of different nets to make a cube is eleven – see this link

Homework Puzzle; The total value of the counters is 486, so halve this to get 243. Now, arrange the counters to equal this amount twice.

The graph on the left (Coronavirus) is for a time period of 30 days, while the one on the right (SARS) is for 8 months! Very poor graphical comparison and hardly relevant, unless it is attempting to downplay the seriousness of the coronavirus?

10 x 9 x 8 + (7 + 6) x 5 x 4 x (3 + 2) x 1 = 2020

NCEA Level 2 Algebra Problem. Using the information given, the shaded area = 9, that is:
y(y-8) = 9 –> y.y – 8y – 9 =0
–> (y-9)(y+1) = 0, therefore y = 9 (can’t have a distance of – 1 for the other solution for y)
Using the top and bottom of the rectangle,
x = (y-8)(y+2) = (9-8)(9+2) = 11
but, the left side = (x-4) = 11-4 = 7, but rhs = y+? = 9+?, which is greater than the value of the opp. side??
[I think that the left had side was a mistake and should have read (x+4)?]

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