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Follow up to Mathematicians at Work

January28

I had the follow up thought to the post below. What kinds of jobs do Mathematicians do? Actually, Mathematics is foundational for most jobs! A good grounding in Mathematics will you in whatever career you enjoy. This website (from the Mathematical Association of America) has a really helpful list of maths-based career profiles and may open many possibilities for you.
 Which reminds me that I must share some info about our youngest daughter and her career progress with (and without) Mathematics.

by posted under Uncategorized | 4 Comments »    
4 Comments to

“Follow up to Mathematicians at Work”

  1. February 1st, 2012 at 8:18 pm       h3maths Says:

    I would trust your chappy – he is the font of electrical knowledge! 🙂


  2. February 1st, 2012 at 5:55 pm       T Says:

    What about an electrician? Our chappy at school said get as high in maths as you can.


  3. January 29th, 2012 at 4:56 pm       h3maths Says:

    Yes, and to a good level. The following info comes from:

    http://www.defencejobs.gov.au/airforce/jobs/Pilot/EducationAndExperience

    “Applicants must have completed Year 12 with passes in English, Mathematics (Tertiary Entrance Level) and two other academic subjects. Maths in Society or similarly modified Maths subjects are not acceptable. Minimum grades are set for chemistry, geography and physics, if studied. Applicants must also have achieved a minimum of a C grade or equivalent in Year 10 science, if sciences not passed at Year 11 or 12.”

    Hope this helps. If always pays to check with your Careers Liaison person and with the tertiary entry group you plan to train with.


  4. January 28th, 2012 at 10:50 pm       T Says:

    Does maths have anything to do with being a pilot?


Post Support

NCEA Level 2 Algebra Problem. Using the information given, the shaded area = 9, that is:
y(y-8) = 9 –> y.y – 8y – 9 =0
–> (y-9)(y+1) = 0, therefore y = 9 (can’t have a distance of – 1 for the other solution for y)
Using the top and bottom of the rectangle,
x = (y-8)(y+2) = (9-8)(9+2) = 11
but, the left side = (x-4) = 11-4 = 7, but rhs = y+? = 9+?, which is greater than the value of the opp. side??
[I think that the left had side was a mistake and should have read (x+4)?]

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